Quotes For Teens

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Quotes For Teens




I've always gravitated towards those ultimate lines in songs, the line you grab on to. That line in 'Smells Like Teen Spirit,' 'Here we are now/Entertain us' - the irony, the antagonism; that's always stuck with me.

I started wearing all black around the time I got into Nirvana. I first heard 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' when I was about 12, and I remember jumping on my bed, so excited about it.

I love Turner Network television; I love Adult Swim. That's actually how I got my start on Cartoon Network was through Adult Swim, originally. I had a special appearance on 'Aqua Teen Hunger Force!'

I've got some great stuff in my sports memorabilia collection. But my favorite thing by far is the robe. I actually have a Ric Flair robe with 'the Nature Boy' on the back. That's awesome. When I look at it, it brings back so many memories of my childhood and my teen years.

Let us develop an agenda for children that says we can do something about teen pregnancy. Let us make sure that parents are old enough, wise enough, and financially able to take care of their children.

I knew that I wanted to intern at 'Teen Vogue' from the moment the first issue hit newsstands. Luckily, the team at Polo Ralph Lauren, where I interned during high school, really believed in me and arranged for an interview with the editors.

The great thing about interning at 'Teen Vogue' is that there is so much room for growth; interns here do incredible things if they work hard enough and think outside the box.

If you're interested in a 'Teen Vogue' internship, take note: it's not all fun and games! Working at a magazine requires a ton of energy and endurance from its interns and editors alike.

The phrase 'teen hottie' literally makes me want to throw up.

People still come up to me and say, 'Hey, 'Teen Wolf!' 'Teen Wolf Too' closed a week after it opened. Where did they see it?

In my early teen years, I wanted to become a vet. That was my plan. I worked as a veterinarian's assistant for a couple of summers.

I was a typical teen growing up in the 1960s, when everybody was into gurus and meditation.

Most people, almost everyone knows of a teen mom. Teen pregnancy rates are growing, and we need to bring awareness to that.

I'm a teen boy, so I like seeing blood and guts. I know it's fake, but I'm having fun.

'Teen Wolf' ending is, like, huge. I know no acting without the show, basically.

I've met so many new fans and amazing people while traveling to new cities and locations throughout 2017 in support of my album 'American Teen.'

I've watched presidential debates since I was a teen, and I love it.

I didn't want to do music. I was very doubtful. I was like, 'Oh my God. No one wants to hear a teen mom rapper.'

Jughead, to me, was reflective of a teen experience that made a lot of sense to me.

Youth comes but once in a lifetime.

The youth need to be enabled to become job generators from job seekers.

When I was in college, I wanted to be involved in things that would change the world.

We must tell girls their voices are important.

Nobody understands anyone 18, including those who are 18.

Maybe that's the whole teen oeuvre, you know covering people in disgusting bodily fluids and whatnot.

Being a teen is past for me. Worrying about the world and my place in it is not.

I love being a part of Aqua Teen.

I was a teen idol and that has a short shelf life.

I can have a song with Ariana Grande that is going to be the song for all the kids and the teen girls, and then another song that could be for a different group of people who all love the song. I'm with whoever. Whatever type of people want to love the music and whatever they love about the music is fine with me.

I like having young assistants in my office; they have energy, and I spend time with them to make sure they understand what we're doing. By investing in them, I'm investing in the magazine. All over 'Vogue,' 'Teen Vogue,' and 'Men's Vogue,' there are people who have been through not only my office but also many other offices at 'Vogue.'

As a young teen, Satan and the idea of some sort of world that you could be in touch with that could empower you was very much the symbol for freedom.

Mrs. Palin is history in a dress. And her script is straight out of Hollywood - like those teen movies with the cliched ending featuring the female valedictorian delivering the speech of a lifetime projecting a bold and transformative future with an independent-minded woman in charge.

I've started ordering out of teen catalogues! T-shirts, little coats, and jackets for around $35 - they're amazing. I've become a really big fan of Urban Outfitters, Alloy and Anthropologie. Because I'll pay for quality, but I will not just pay for trend. Psychologically, I have trouble with that.

Can you imagine peaking as a teen? I think if you peak in high school, there's a problem. That's what my sister always said: 'Don't worry, you'll peak later.'

I think, very often, little girls look at these teen television shows and think, 'I have to have a boyfriend because Blair Waldorf has a boyfriend, and she's always fighting over boys!'

I'm really loving Billie Eilish's 'idontwannabeyouanymore.' Her dreamy vocals offer such a lovely moment of escape, and there's a sophistication to the lyrics that are so surprising coming from a teen artist.

I feel really honored to be part of The #seetherealme campaign. It's really amazing, as it helps many teen girls who are struggling. It helps them to find themselves and be true to who they are.

When I was in the 12th grade, I got my girlfriend pregnant. I just got out of school, she was a 10th-grader. I'm a teen parent, and I'm at a point where I'm like, 'Man I've got to do something.'

I have cystic acne, and sometimes when I have a breakout, it triggers me back to that time when I was a teen and I feel so self-conscious - like the whole world is looking at my bad skin. I've definitely not gone out of the house because of a breakout, which is horrible.

There's always a Justin Bieber. Ever since I've been around, there's always been one of him. You know, you can trace it back from how old you are and the boy bands that came along then and the teen sensations and whatnot. And, you know, good for them. There's a few of them that make it out and a few of them that don't.

If you were an optimistic teen, then you'll be an optimist at 80. People's reactions to bad events are highly stable over a half century or more.

Even with the beauty stories we put out, we saw there was an opportunity to address issues of representation, identity, self-expression. We created the community that we wanted to have at 'Teen Vogue.' We were willing to lose some to have more.

'Teen Vogue' fortunately has proved you can have smart, political, and fashionable content delivered in one place, and you don't have to choose.

As a teen, every major moment was preempted by a torturous, hours-long hair-straightening session. Sleek, silky strands made me feel prettier. And the truth is, I was completely clueless about how to deal with my curls! When they weren't flatironed into submission for special occasions, they were practically glued down with gobs of gel.

It's fun to sniff and slather on beauty products, but the end goal is finding what appeals most to 'Teen Vogue' readers and reporting on it in the most compelling way.

When 'Teen Vogue' started out, 'Teen Vogue' was an aspirational fashion magazine for fashion lovers. You know, it was the little sister to 'Vogue.' And over the years, we've realized that our mission was really to become more focused on making this an inclusive community that speaks to every kind of young person.

'Teen Vogue' is so much more than just a magazine. It's so much more than just a website. It's so much more than social. It's really about the audience, and so we're going to continue to innovate and continue to find new ways of reaching this audience in meaningful ways.

N.E.R.D. was also from - not too far from where I was from growing up. For a lot of people who make music, that was a huge influence in teen years.

People love teen movies because everyone can relate.

Even when I was a teen model, I didn't think it was fair that I had to enter the acting world to get insurance.

It's only shocking to the uninitiated that 'Teen Vogue' would have the audacity to be political and style-focused.

Teen boys are a huge mess.

Teen pregnancy went way down in the '90s, and 75 percent of it was because of increased use of contraception.

There was a three-year chunk as a teen where I should have been tranquilized and put in a cage.

With any teen show, there's going to be drama and heartache.

In 'Teen Wolf,' I don't really have any stunts. And if I do, it's like Stiles falls on the ground or something like that.

I grew up in a difficult environment, but I became a Christian as a teen. My mom and my sister soon became Christians also.

I became a teen idol. At the time, it embarrassed me.

I was a teen idol in Latin America.

I'm excited to see a new age of rom-coms, and especially teen romantic comedies, because when I was younger, I was watching 'Harry Potter' and 'Hunger Games' and stuff like that. I loved those movies, but they are a little bit heavy. We didn't really get to have the lighthearted love stories.

Teen fandom is so potent. Any choice they make in pop culture forces the rest of the world to take notice.

I didn't date for my entire teen life - it just wasn't on my mind.

I was one of those daughters who saw my mother as my enemy when I was a teen.

When I was doing my research for 'Branded,' I'd meet groups of teenagers and preteenagers or tweens, and they would laugh at a magazine spread in a women's magazine or teen girl magazine and say, 'I'd never buy this outfit. I know these girls are starving themselves.' But they probably would go out and buy the thing eventually.

Before I even got signed as a teen, I was singing with people like Hoyt Axton and Mickey Gilley. I worked with Jerry Lee Lewis and Little Richard.

'I Think We're Alone Now' just makes people feel good. It became a teen anthem twice. How cool is that?

Growing up, I had an internal struggle with my body because I was really chubby. My sisters were younger, and they were all skinny and all cute. As a teen, I definitely had, like, an extra 30 pounds of weight.

Guilty pleasure implies that it's something that I feel guilty for watching... people tell me I should feel guilty for watching because I'm too old to watch it, but I don't give a damn: I love everything on Cartoon Network from 'Adventure Time' to 'The Adventures of Gumball', 'Teen Titans'... all those shows that are for my kids, I like those!

We left Egypt when I was seven, and we didn't return until I was 21. My teen years were divided between the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. Up until we left the U.K., it was like your regular teenage years. The one thing I remember is that I couldn't date. That was one thing my parents made very clear.

Growing up, I didn't have a chance to watch a lot of films. It wasn't until my teen years that I had to chance to see the classic films.

I still bump 'Smells Like Teen Spirit.' I used to listen to it before all my football games.

Being a teen idol or being a heartthrob on all the magazines, with Shaun Cassidy, Leif Garrett, and Scott Baio - it was embarrassing! I never understood it. I mean, why me? I never really got it.

People now tell me it's a good thing I stayed away from teen films. Well, it wasn't my choice. I wasn't hired.

I love writing about the summer between high school and college. It's the last gasp of really being a teen.

It never hurts to tell your teen they matter more than their looks.

As a teen, 'Thunder Road' was always in my head.

All that stuff - 'teen idol' - that wasn't me.

I'm definitely of the 'Harry Potter'-transfigured-me-into-a-reader-and-writer generation. And that's really all I read throughout my teen years, because I really devoted all my time to writing and reading friends' fan-fiction.

My first job in TV was hosting this young teen magazine show, and all these high school teenagers showed up from all over Sacramento, California, and they chose four of us to host the show, two boys and two girls. And of the two girls, I was kind of the perky smart one and the other girl was the pretty one.

When I was a teen, I was never really into the captain of the football team or the student body president. The guys I liked were quirky and different: They listened to music I'd never heard of, never had lunch or gas money, and could always make you laugh.

As I got older, I had a bunch of friends that were various teen stars. I've always known people in the spotlight and people who just grew up in L.A. and had nothing to do with the industry. It's not a glamorous thing to me. It's just a different type of business.

I'm not a teen anymore, but growing up, some of my favorite things were, like, 'Twin Peaks,' which wasn't even really my time, and this is one of the things, like a weird, quirky, small town mystery.

Growing up in New Jersey, teen clubs were your life. I'm not kidding! That was it. I was literally tied up five days a week with teen clubs; my parents would drop me off. Like, I didn't even drive.

When I was 13, I moved to Los Angeles to pursue television and film roles. I booked shows like 'The Secret Life of the American Teenager,' 'Liv and Maddie,' and 'Teen Wolf.'

When I was in my teen years and in my 20s and even 60s, it was okay to drop everything and disappear and become a road warrior for all those months. But after a while you get... y'know, one likes to have some home life.

Like me as a teen - and like many teenagers now - my characters are at a peculiar crossroads in their lives. They desperately seek freedom. But at the same time, they are constantly thwarted.

If you were an alien who came to our bookstores - or browsed our teen magazines - you'd think that only Earth girls who look like Mila Kunis ever got any action.

Just do me a favor. Don't call me 'former teen heartthrob,' okay? It's as if they were constantly discussing your second year of college. I'm not back there anymore. I'm living in the present.

Reading was my escape growing up in Ohio. Both of my parents lost their jobs when I was a teen, and it was hard. But I always had my books. Reading gave me a way of living different lives.

My high school years were fun and frustrating, typical of the teen years. The most important accomplishment was meeting my wife, Ruth.

Of course Stephen King doesn't believe in teen novels. I've started to suspect he doesn't even believe in teenagers.

As a unique person, I was bullied badly as a teen.

My whole life, growing up, I always wanted to be in comedy. I never felt comfortable doing the 'teen hunk' thing.

One of the things that 'Love, Simon' is doing that hasn't been done before is it's a gay teen rom-com with a mainstream wide release and the backing of a studio that previous gay rom-coms have not had. I'm really excited by that.

I've always enjoyed teen characters, and kids as well. For whatever reason, I seem to have an ability to do it sort of well, and I enjoy doing it.

I've been trying face products since I was, like 13, 12 years old. I use to break out a lot, especially in my teen years.

My top goal as your Secretary of State is to save lives by reducing fatal traffic crashes. When I established the Teen Driver Safety Task Force, the goal was to improve Illinois' graduated driver licensing law and, even more importantly, to save lives.

During my teen years, I was real emotional. I could be really up or down.

I'm not just a child star. And I'm not just someone's sister. And I'm not just a teen mom.

By no means do we think, 'Oh, it's cool to be a teen mom.' I definitely don't think that it's cool.

When it's my time to go, I'll go, but the only time that's going to be for 'Teen Mom' is when the network takes it off the air.

What's great about teen fiction is that it's all mixed up - there's highbrow and lowbrow!

Being a musician since I was a teen, Guitar Center is the staple. You need anything to create, it's there. You need a Guitar Center. You gotta give it homage. It's a tool shed, and without the tool shed, it's hard to create.

I was a total metal-head as a teen. I still love it, too.

I watch a lot of teen TV and read a lot of YA novels. I also talk to teens whenever I can. There are cultural differences between when I was a teen and now, but emotions - anger, angst, love - are the same.

I started a MySpace teen lit discussion group and invited people to join.

Weird Al was something that kids would listen to. It's funny, super funny, smart. It's just kind of jokey. I remember hearing 'Smells Like Nirvana' before hearing 'Smells Like Teen Spirit.' That's how it really worked. I think it's just such a cool thing how he introduced us to so many cool bands. Even Queen - 'Another One Rides the Bus.'

The donning of the ear buds marks the beginning of teen life, when children set off on their own for the passage through adolescence.

One of the things that defines YA is a really strong narrative. Adults love YA because, at the end of the day, they're good stories and page-turners. The other element is emotion. The teen years are a very emotional and intense time, and I think it's a time we that we can all relate to and remember.

'Teen Beach Movie' was a lot of fun because we were in Puerto Rico on an island - you can't even call it work!

I was a typical Valley teen, in smoggy Van Nuys.

I never listened to the Grateful Dead as a teen; the only exposure I got was what came through the walls when my sister was listening to them.

I didn't have a teen age at all. I didn't even look at boys, never mind... then suddenly it was like, 'Oh my god!' So I made up for a lot of lost time very quickly. It was kind of bonkers. Working hard, partying hard - but also experiencing life, you know.

People look down on teen moms and young mothers when they are the most gracious and significant women on this Earth. They sacrifice their freedom and their lives to give life.

In my teen years leading up to the Olympics, I loved having the excuse to skip out on parties because of skating. Partying wasn't my thing anyway. Mostly I hung out with other skaters. We were all buddies, so it's not like I missed out on socializing. I was really enjoying myself.

I grew up as an avid reader. I would go to the library and check out 40 books a week. Some of them were smarty books; most of them were 'Sweet Valley High' and young teen romance.

I do a lot of teen shows and voice over work for animation, so when I got the part in 'The Number 23,' it was really cool because now I get to be in a movie with Jim Carrey. Acting in this movie was really a learning experience for me.

There was never a book, a magazine, a movie, a television show that spoke to my experience as a bicultural teen. I could find a million articles on finding the perfect prom dress or getting the guy of your dreams, but how about 'Ten Sure Fire Steps to Being the Perfect Korean Daughter and Not Be a Freak at Your High School?'

Lesley Gore's part-time field was pop singer, and in her brief but urgent prime, she was the Queen of Teen Angst. She endured heartbreak as a birthday girl betrayed by her beau in 'It's My Party,' savored revenge in the sequel 'Judy's Turn to Cry' and belted the proto-feminist anthem 'You Don't Own Me.'

I was a vegetarian through many of my teen years and easily revert back to that occasionally, but my immune system is usually happier with a bit of real meat.

Teen problem novels? I can go through them like a box of chocolates. And there are fantasy books out now that need a lot more editing. Fantasy got to be so popular that people began to think 'We don't need to be as diligent with the razor blade,' but they do.

Honestly, I've never had anybody with 'Teen Mom' ever be anything but great to me. Except the editors - they suck. Everybody from the crew, I love them, they're like family to me... I've never had a problem with any of them. Except the editors.

I grew up watching a lot of stuff, like 'Teen Titans.'

When I got near teen age, I was so happy with my friends and the African-American culture that I couldn't imagine not being part of it.

The 'Teen Wolf' fans are so great.

My mother wrote a teen column for the South China Morning Post in the 1950s when she was growing up in Hong Kong. Her name was Lily Mark, but she sometimes wrote under her confirmation name, Margaret Mark. That was how she met my father.

My interest was magic, believe it or not. I became an amateur magician and did something like 400 magic shows through my teen years.

Costumes say a lot about a character. When it came to 'Palo Alto,' it was important for me that the kids didn't look perfect. In most teen movies today, all of the clothes are expensive. I remember wearing a lot of dirty vintage clothes.

Once a teen has been identified as part of the 'target market,' he knows he's done for. The object of the game is to confound the marketers, and keep one's own, authentic culture from showing up at the shopping mall as a prepackaged corporate product.

Teenagers are asking, 'Who am I?' and 'How do I fit in?' in every aspect of their lives, and the best YA romances appreciate that there is more to a teen's life than finding love.

What's with the whole 'child actor' and 'teen actor' thing? You're either an actor or actress, or you're not. I don't get it! I want to be taken seriously as an actor.

It seems like whenever a big newspaper or TV show talks about teen literature, they focus on dark books or vampire books. It's kind of this cliche. It seems like the only time adults pay attention is with that angle.

There was so much pressure to fit in, I tried to force myself to be like everyone else. The last thing any teen wants is to be 'uncool.'

As a teen, I enjoyed Sufi music and ghazals the most. But as my career began, I drifted off to playback and other streams over the years.

This may just be me, but I feel like everyone's dream is to live as an American high school student. There are so many teen films set in America that you live vicariously through them, anyway.

Yes, my pageant career was incredibly short. I started at 19 and was done at 21. I started by competing for Miss California Teen, which I wound up winning, and I literally just entered the contest on a whim!

I absolutely adore classic crime and read a huge amount as a teen - Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, Sherlock Holmes, Josephine Tey, and many more.

'Choli Ke Peeche' and 'Ek Doh Teen' were my favourite numbers as a kid. I was a huge fan of Madhuri Dixit and would spend hours looking into the mirror and aping her expressions, believing that the mirror was the camera!

I love being a teen because you don't have all the responsibilities of an adult yet.

After 'Freaky Friday,' another teen movie was not on my playlist.

I love the cast of 'Teen Wolf,' and I try to keep in touch with them as much as possible.

I've thought about it, but I don't think I'd ever get a 'Teen Wolf' tattoo, and I don't know why.

My first break was becoming a staff writer on the rebooted '90210.' And then I got stuck writing in the teen genre for a while.

I went on an audition once for a show, and the feedback was to play an angry teen. My agent convinced me to try out. I was really bitter for a while, because it sucks when you don't get good scripts after working on good quality.

When I started writing, there was nothing about zombies. It was all teen movies, which to me are scarier than zombies, but that's another story.

Every season of 'Teen Wolf' was really cool and exciting and unique, but there was just something about the first season story-wise that was, I think, the coolest.

I think the feeling was that 'Venture Brothers' really has something to sell in terms of a feature. 'Aqua Teen' is an element minute cartoon, and its very subversive and non sequitur and weird. We were writing the one show where we were constantly like, 'God, I wish we had another hour to tell this story.' It seemed like a natural fit.

And at some point I would like to talk my publisher into doing an anthology of my poetry alongside some teen readers' poetry. It would be fun, and really wonderful to get their stuff out there.

'Awkward' is a ubiquitous teen word to denote socially unsanctioned behavior. It usually implies first- or secondhand embarrassment when you or a friend step outside the rules. Awkward doesn't sound overtly judgmental or negative; it's deliberately vague.

People ask me, 'How's 'Teen Wolf?' and I tell them it's literally the best job I've ever had. It's hard. Everybody wants to be a series regular. It's something that a lot of actors would kill to have. That being said, it's very demanding of you, in so many different ways.

Sometimes people come up to me and say, 'You were my teen crush.' I'm honored and I'm touched, but I also ask, 'What happened? Why'd you take the poster down?' I get a little heartbroken in that situation.

That can be the most painstaking aspect of being a teen, figuring out what the world really looks like. If you find someone in a book, you know you're not alone and that's what's so comforting about books.

I've seen a lot of zombie films as a teenager, and I think teens in general, or teen boys, watch a lot of horror. There's a lot of morbidity that goes on in that age.

I've been writing songs since I was a teenager, so one kind of song I've written a lot is about, I don't know, teen angst feelings - feeling unsure of yourself and immature.

Trump gets too much credit for 'Teen Vogue''s evolution.

There's a freshness to the approach of teen chefs. They're lighthearted, and they're not afraid to take risks.

I just felt being part of my peer group so strongly. I was immersed in teen culture, but not taken in by it.

Ric Flair was such a huge part of my childhood and teen years. He's an icon.

I was considered chubby as a teen.

I grew up in Detroit. I was a teen father. I lived on welfare for three years. I have a brother serving life in prison, though I believe he's innocent.

It's easy to feel like you don't have any control over yourself or your life or your body as a teen - everything is changing so fast, and a lot of it feels so outside of your power. I think that's why a lot of teens form really strong attachments to fictional characters or celebrities, draw their own characters or write themselves into fan fiction.

Obviously when you're a teen you have no money, so you make, like, three outfits out of one dress. You're like, 'OK cut the arms here. Alright: New party, cut them to here.'

Fifth grade was when I first heard 'Smells Like Teen Spirit;' it was the energy, and his voice. I liked 311 and Sublime, too, though that might have been a little after that.

In the public, it seems to be painted that when minorities get pregnant, they need to get abortions, especially when it comes to teen pregnancy. It's like, when black girls are pregnant, it's like a statistic, but when white girls get pregnant, they get a TV show.

It's important to me that I don't get trapped in the whole teen scene, because I feel that you can get lost in those kind of movies, and they aren't really about the actors; they're about the selling of the concept, and how much money it makes.

It's hard being homeless at any age, but at 16 years old? I can't even imagine. When you're a homeless teen, how do you build a future or have any sort of life?

The United States has made remarkable progress in reducing both teen pregnancy and racial and ethnic differences, but the reality is, too many American teens are still having babies.

I wanted to be a writer as a teen... so storytelling was my first love. In my late teens, design became an obsession as I realized that I could express myself through the medium. Much later, when I founded Fuseproject in 1999, our slogan became 'design brings stories to life.'

People don't know the real me. The hard times I went through are what led me to my life now. I was a mess as a teen! I was kind of wild and really unhappy.

Katy Perry still gets me every time. She's very funny in person! We met at the Teen Choice Awards and she pulled my cheeks apart and told me how cute I was. My life was literally flashing before my eyes!

If I can write a book that will help the world make a little more sense to a teen, then that's why I was put on the planet.

'Catcher in the Rye.' I feel like any brooding teen loves that book.

'Rookie' is not your guide to Being a Teen. It is, quite simply, a bunch of writing and art we like and believe in.

I got a guitar when I was 14. I made really, really, really bad music as a teen. I learned to play Smashing Pumpkins and Hole songs.

I have a very large shoebox overflowing with lyrics I've been writing and collecting since my teen years and into my late 20s, with lyrics from all walks of my life. Darkness, being in love, being heartbroken, finding yourself... and lyrics that I've been sitting on for, like, seven years, that I haven't done anything with.

I was a troubled teen and I was constantly looking for someone to throw me a rope. Those ropes are connections. They allow us to see that life exists beyond the little worlds we are currently a part of.

It's not hard to get into a teen's head, because it's all emotions. Their feelings are amplified; you have no luxury of hindsight. If you haven't had your heart broken before, you don't know that you'll be able to get back up again.

I don't think you ever love anything as passionately as you do when you're a teen. You remember the books you read as a young person your whole life. I feel so lucky to write for young adults.

I think that, oftentimes, what people say is, 'We need an actress who'll be able to greenlight a movie,' and my counterargument to that is always that, when it comes to a teen movie, you have very few people who can greenlight a movie.

It's important for Asian American kids to see themselves in stories and to feel seen. They need to know that their stories are universal, too, that they, too, can fall in love in a teen movie. They don't have to be the sidekick; they can be the hero.

I just fell into the job as a fashion editor at a teen magazine. I was there for two years, and I left there as a senior fashion editor at the age of 25.

When I became a teen, I ran into a friend at a magic shop who took me under his wing. I started reading up on magical theory and immediately blended that with what my brothers had shown me.

The average teen today spends about 35 hours a week in front of a screen of some kind: iPod, movie, TV, video. And a lot of it is good, but a lot of it's not. And so I think you've got that five hours a day of media coming into your kid's head that's creating a lot of havoc out there.

The endless teen franchises that come out of Hollywood... more often than not, the central character doesn't have any discernible character traits. They're just the young, good-looking guy who goes on this journey. They're always played by fantastic young actors, but ultimately, they're not very interesting characters.

I certainly witnessed bullying as a teen in both a small and a big school setting. I feel like it is a universal topic.

'Teen Spirit' is a celebration of the power that music can deliver to the cinematic experience.

I love telling teen stories where the characters are experiencing things for the first time - the stakes feel really high.

To be honest, and this is terrible to admit, I hardly read any teen mystery books at all.

Female adolescence is - universally - an emotionally and psychologically intense period.

My own experience being bullied - it made me a more compassionate person. It made me more sympathetic to the adolescent experience.

I'm a comic nerd. I'm a former serious collector for much of my childhood and early teen years I wanted to draw underground comics.

Youth is the trustee of prosperity.

To an adolescent, there is nothing in the world more embarrassing than a parent.

I will be able to look back on my teen years as spent on a television set just having the biggest bunch of fun.

As a teenager, I didn't read a ton of teen fiction, and now I feel like I wish that I had.

It's so easy as a teen to feel like everybody is having this normal experience - except you. You're on the outside.

I've had a lot of compulsions throughout my life which mainly started as a teen around the time I was doing exams.

Jockeying for a popularity position has been a valorized teen tradition since the notion of a discrete teen stage of life was invented.

Teenage girls read in packs. It's true today, and it was true when I was a teen growing up in a small town in northeast Oklahoma.

One of my first paid gigs was writing psychology quizzes for 'YM,' a monthly teen magazine like 'Seventeen.'

I'm ashamed to say, but as a teen, there were times when I had to go to the church and get help.

I write edgy, sexy teen romances, and that's what I'll continue to do.

Heredity is what sets the parents of a teenager wondering about each other.

Your modern teenager is not about to listen to advice from an old person, defined as a person who remembers when there was no Velcro.

Teenagers who are never required to vacuum are living in one.

I got through my teen years by being a bit of a clown.

I was a handful growing up.

Adolescence is when girls experience social pressure to put aside their authentic selves and to display only a small portion of their gifts.

When I look in the mirror I see the girl I was when I was growing up, with braces, crooked teeth, a baby face and a skinny body.

I wasn't going to have fun doing a teen movie again.

I'd never made a teen comedy in my life.

I hate it when people call me a teen queen.

They were marketing me as a teen idol, when the stuff on the record was not what teen idols were doing at the time.

Growing up, I've enjoyed hunting with my father.

I think there are worse things for a teen to be enraptured with than 'Twilight.'

Being a teen idol is what I've waited for my whole life.

I had teen angst for a while, but I think every teenager has the angst.

Ever since I was a little teen, I was told by my great-grandma that you've got to always have a good moisturizer. I use cocoa butter, and I use it for all things needing moisture - face, hair, throw it on those legs at the beach, get them all shiny. Cocoa butter is such a great product.

A surprising number of American skyjackers were not yet old enough to drink or sometimes even drive. These adolescents were generally inept at planning their crimes, and few of their capers met with any success; most seemed to end within moments of starting, usually after a fatherly pilot convinced the nervous teen to hand over his gun.

I so think it's limiting to define an audience ahead of time. This is something I've brought on myself by being like, 'There are no 'real' teen publications! That's what I'll do!' But then it's like, well, if I want 'Rookie' to be successful and popular, then people will invalidate the realness by saying it's popular and mainstream.

How the original 'Cosmos' affected me personally was long-term. I wasn't born early enough to see the original series, but after getting a hold of it in my teen years, it was one of the driving forces behind my passion for science.

What I think we should be doing is refocusing all the prevention budgets, all the money spent on teen gangs and young offenders, on conception to age two at a rate of 2% a year.

I won Miss Teen World, and then a movie rep saw me on the pageant website and thought that I had the perfect image for the role in 'Madrasapattinam.'

I love being in a public space where teenagers are talking. And the funny thing is that it hasn't changed that much. There's certainly slang that I'm not familiar with, but among the average teen, it's still the same.

I love Deathstroke! I was 12 in 1980 when Deathstroke appeared in 'Teen Titans' #2.

I actually love writing for teens best. I had such an awful time in my own teen years - I love having the chance to relive them through my fiction.

I didn't know what was going to happen with 'Teen Wolf.' I was only scheduled to do four episodes for them, but they kept me on, and I was like, 'Sweet! I'm still employed! That's awesome!' And then, they let me know that they were considering having me for the second half of the season.

I'm still good friends with everybody from 'Teen Wolf.' I still see them, and I go to Jeff Davis' for 'Teen Wolf' night when I can. It was such a rewarding experience. That's such a fun set.

Like so many other bored teens, I was a bored teen with a hobby. The only difference was mine was obsessing about crime.

Teen authors love to flirt with taboo, to grapple - sensitively - with dark and frightening issues, and there is nothing darker and more frightening than cancer.

Clothes are like a suit of armour when you're young. I was quite a shy teen, so I wanted to make aggressive statements with the way I looked. I'd say my goth/indie stage was the worst: there was a lot of experimentation involving pink food dye in my fringe.

I took high school very casually. There was Teen Town, chess, tennis, boxing, running. Lots of things going on.

Certain elements of teen life that, 10 years ago, were very important to me still, are becoming less so as I get older. I mean, I've kinda gotten over, I guess I'm saying, the fact that I had trouble getting a date for the prom.

Typically, middle-class educated parents' search for their children's schools takes on the feel, if not of teen girls trying on different outfits, of adolescents trying on various selves.

My first encounter with Cyborg was through the 'Teen Titans' cartoon.

I tend to like writing long stories in comics. I worked on 'Flash,' 'Teen Titans' and 'JSA' for years. I always like diving into characters.

It's hard to feel like a teen idol.

I will say that I know Nirvana did a show and played a few chords from 'More Than a Feeling' before they did 'Teen Spirit,' and it wasn't very good. But in all seriousness, 'Teen Spirit' was a great song. If subconsciously or somehow I had any influence on that, I'll take that as a compliment.

As a kid, I was definitely a DC guy. I started reading big time in the '80s at the height of the Wolfman/Perez 'New Teen Titans.' That was definitely the book that hooked me.

Watching 'CSI: Miami' is like watching 'Teen Jeopardy!' or doing the crossword puzzle in 'People' magazine. It makes you feel smart even when you're not.

I didn't know too much about his comic book history. I know that in 'Teen Titans,' he's much more the comedic relief. But after reading the comic book iteration of Cyborg in 'The New Teen Titans' from the 1980s that Marv Wolfman and George Perez had worked on, I saw that there was a lot of texture to the character.

We grew up listening to so much hardcore: everything from the very early D.C. stuff - Teen Idols, Minor Threat, Dag Nasty, SOA, Government Issue - to bands who weren't straight edge, like Negative Approach. I really feel they were one of the greatest punk bands ever.

I grew up in a really small town. I had a great friend group and an amazing community of people who were supporting and loving and moving out to L.A. it was really hard to find that. Especially just starting off my teen years.

I think if you ask people why they watch me, there would be some common thread among all of them that I'm somewhat of an awkward older sister. I have a teen, mostly female demographic. How that happened, I don't know. But I think they see me as some sort of bizarre role model, and I'll keep trying to do that for them.

I first read Harper Lee's 'To Kill a Mockingbird' as a teen in school, like you did. I read the book alone, eating lunch at my locker, neatly scored oranges my mother divided into five lines with a circle at the top, so my fingers could dig more easily into the orange skin. To this day, the smell of oranges reminds me of 'Mockingbird.'

The eight months I took off between 'Teen Vogue' and 'Lucky' afforded me such amazing opportunities, and I learned so much from so many different people - the brands that I worked with, the companies that I was consulting for.

I grew up in this household where reading was the most noble thing you could do. When I was a teenager, we would have family dinners where we all sat there reading. It wasn't because we didn't like each other. We just liked reading. The person who made my reading list until my late teen years was my mom.

I'll write teen stories as long as people will let me. I'll also be excited for the day when I'm told I can no longer write teen stories.

I went down the creative path in my teen years, and when I was in high school, in my junior year, I would perform at this program that was very similar to 'School of Rock.' That was when I started writing and realized that's what I wanted to do.

I wouldn't say I'm stuck in my adolescence, but I think, like a lot of people, I carry my teen years with me. I feel really in touch with those feelings, and how intense and complicated life seems in those years.

I got the acting bug really young, when I was around, like, 10. I pretty much just wanted to be Michael J. Fox. He was in 'Teen Wolf' - that was, like, the coolest role, and then he did 'Back to the Future,' and that was the coolest role.

I was, like, this token teen angst child of Broadway. It's so funny. What is that? I don't even know. But I loved it.

I've never really been a rebellious teen.

The eighties were my teen years, so the GoGos are sort of a touchstone.

I worked on congressional campaigns when I was a teenager. I did United Way fundraisers when I was a teen. We advocated; we spoke out. I protested the first Iraq War in college.

I started working as a movie writer and a movie producer... all the way back to 'Teen Wolf' and 'Commando.' All of those experiences, plus working both at DC and at Marvel - each of those things are bricks in the wall.

The best thing I can say about 'Teen Wolf Too' is that it's the only time anyone ever referred to me as Preston Sturges. Leonard Maltin wrote that 'Teen Wolf Too' made 'Teen Wolf' look like Preston Sturges. I've always prided myself on that.

We all have things in our lives that are terrible: you apologize for them; you wish you never had you name on it. But 'Teen Wolf' is something that I'm very proud of.

'Snowpiercer' is a little bit more experimental, I think, and crafted for a slightly different audience. 'The Giver' is more about teen angst.

Initially, when I'd heard of 'Teen Wolf,' I had never actually sat down to watch the series. But during my audition process, before I had a clue that I would even be considered, I started watching the show to get a feel for it and to see what type of show it was.

'Teen Wolf' has such a die-hard fan base, which we're all so grateful for. It's amazing to have that kind of support because, without the fans, we wouldn't have this show.

I didn't know what it was going to look like or how anything was going to turn out, but the production on 'Teen Wolf' is so amazing. The way that they shoot it, edit it, and put it out there, it's really so exciting. I trust the team so much. They do such a good job.

I grew up watching 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' and used to dream that I would grow up to be just like her. In a way, 'Teen Wolf' has a lot of those kinds of characters. We're just kids by day, and yet we're trying to fight demons and werewolves and bad people and save people that we love.

I just want to say I love Kira Yukimura so much. I loved my experience on 'Teen Wolf.'

Robin McKinley's 'The Blue Sword' was a defining book of my teen years, and I'd love to have more books like that in the world.

I think doing 'Teen Wolf' is just giving me a really great opportunity to possibly get other jobs and show what I can do.

Something I love about 'Teen Wolf' is that my character is written in as just a normal girl. She could have been any ethnicity; she doesn't have to be Asian.

By the time I was a teen, I was an expert at scanning people's faces, always in search of eyes like mine. I devoured glossy magazines, ever mindful of the language we used to talk about beauty. The sections on how to apply makeup intrigued me most precisely because their audience never included me.

I consider myself a writer. I always wanted to act, and as a teen, I studied acting devotedly. Eventually, I got writing work, but very little acting work.

I don't usually like teen novels written in the present tense, particularly those told from a first-person viewpoint. Too many writers seem to believe that using either or both devices automatically imbues their stories with deep seriousness and a contemporary feel.

The first time I got pregnant, I was a young girl - I was 17 years old. Although I knew right away that I wanted to keep my child, being a pregnant teen was an extremely scary experience for me. Luckily, my family and friends were very supportive and were there for me every step of the way.

I grew up in a small town in Kansas, so I love meeting the fans. Those are the people who spend time out of their day to watch the things that I've done, and I've gotten to do some great supernatural stuff - 'Teen Wolf' and 'The Gates' before that - so it's nice when I get to go to Comic-Con every year.

I think the fans from the original 'Teen Wolf' tuned in expecting us to ruin the franchise, and I think that we've only heightened it. So we've brought 'Teen Wolf' back.

I think there's actually a benefit to working with teen actors: they've got such boundless energy, and everybody is willing to try different things.

As a white teen, I was very drawn to hip-hop culture, almost to the point of disappearing in it - there was a sense of having no sense of authenticity except this one that wasn't mine.

Cartoons are the best stuff on TV. 'Wonder Showzen,' 'Aqua Teen,' 'SpongeBob,' and, of course, 'South Park' - one of the funniest shows ever made.

I pass on a lot of teen roles that get sent to me because a lot of the time it doesn't feel real. It's sugar-coated. There's no depth to it.

I've always enjoyed the teen angst thing. I had a lot of teen angst as I was growing up, so I think I have a lot to say about it through characters before I have to move on.

There's a theory about fame: the moment it strikes, it arrests development. Michael Jackson remained suspended in childhood, enjoying sleepovers and funfairs; Winona Ryder, an errant teen who dabbled in shoplifting and experimented with pills; George Clooney, a 30-year-old commitment-phobe, never quite ready yet to settle down.

For me, the teen years were all about searching for a place for myself, wondering why I seemed so different than everyone else, wondering especially why no one could look past the surface and figure out who I really was underneath.

Teen fiction should be about teenagers - no matter how many arguments there are about what YA lit should be, this seems like the one thing we can all agree on.

When I turned thirteen and took a typing class, with typical early teen enthusiasm and total lack of critical ability, I started sending my stuff to publishers once I'd babysat long enough to earn the postage.

I could have been on a path that led to different, more traditional teen romance, and 'Nip/Tuck' shook me loose from any generalization I might have been forced into. It helped me understand I wanted to take on things that were edgier, more challenging and riskier.

It's always good to get feedback from people. I've been fortunate that all the fans, and especially fans of 'Teen Wolf,' have been really gracious.

When I was 14, I came very close to becoming a gay teen suicide 'statistic,' but I then turned to music, my piano, my loved ones, and discovered that it does in fact get better.

I don't really think I feel pressured to become a teen sensation because that's not really my goal in life. It's not really about being star, being popular or having lots of girls. It's really about continuing to be able to act and have fun, and do what I like to do.

I think if we were going to worry about teen pregnancy being glamorized, we should worry about shows like 'Teen Mom'. If people are going to want to have children at a young age because they see it on TV, I think that depends on the type of person you're dealing with.

I actually hope people don't react to 'Impossible' in a way where they think it's terribly retro. The plot needed to do what it needed to do. But I'm a little surprised to find myself looking a little bit like an advocate of teen marriage. It takes some exceptional circumstances for that to be a reasonable idea.

When I was a freshman, I didn't have that much time for extra-curriculars, so I didn't do any theater stuff. Actually, I didn't do it with my school. I did theater with this thing called Teen Source.

A departure from the movie with Michael J. Fox, 'Teen Wolf' tells the story of how a group of angsty teens deal with werewolves, their supernatural kin and the world of trouble that comes with it, all while trying to still live their lives.

My writing books with positive gay characters has come more out of anger than anything else: anger at not having been able to find honest, accurate books about people like myself as a teen, books that show we're as diverse as straight people and that we can lead happy, healthy, productive lives just as straight people can.

'Pretty Little Liars,' you know, it's a teen show that grew to be something bigger. I think you had girls from ages 7 to, like, 20 watching the show, and that was the predominant audience. Then it grew to be for girls, boys, men, women, people who are 7 to 35. I think that's crazy.

It hasn't been until the last couple years that I've started playing close to my age. But it's fun playing the younger roles because it takes you back to the teen years.

This is actually something no one knows, but my mom was really the one who created the entire style for 'Teen Witch.' I'm dead serious. She was super involved, and is super creative, so I wore a lot of my actual clothes in the movie. Truly, Louise was my mom's vision. She really created an iconic character.

Because of people like that guy in San Francisco who told me it changed his life, 'Teen Witch' is my most favorite thing I've ever done. I see how happy it makes people, and that makes me happy. The great thing is that no one realized it was going to become all these things when we were making it. We thought we were making a very serious movie.

My younger sister and younger brother are huge 'Teen Witch' fans.

This is actually something no one knows, but my mom was really the one who created the entire style for 'Teen Witch.' I'm dead serious.

I think teen girls will like 'Geek Charming' because they really focus on the 'populars' and nerdy people and people who are in between the nerds and between the populars. So it really hits every category of what girls are going through in high school.

There's an indie movie I did called 'Fat Kid Rules the World,' which was based on a teen book, and it's a fabulous story, and hopefully it'll go to theaters because it is an amazing story.

I was a big fan of black gospel. As a kid, there were black groups I sang with from my teen years to my early 20s.

As a teenager I was so insecure. I was the type of guy that never fitted in because he never dared to choose. I was convinced I had absolutely no talent at all. For nothing. And that thought took away all my ambition too.

Adolescents are not monsters. They are just people trying to learn how to make it among the adults in the world, who are probably not so sure themselves.

You have teenagers thinking they're going to make millions as NBA stars when that's not realistic for even 1 percent of them. Becoming a scientist or engineer is.

If you try to bring 'teen drama,' you end up doing nothing but pouting.

Writing a teen character is something I wanted to try again for a long time!

I don't want to just be in the normal kind of teen movie.

Material Girls was so different for me, I'd never done a teen movie.

Yes, but I don't think of the Teen Angel as of an age.

My teenage years were exactly what they were supposed to be. Everybody has their own path. It's laid out for you. It's just up to you to walk it.

I wanted to be with the kind of people I'd grown up with, but you can't go back to them and be one of them again, no matter how hard you try.

So many people try to grow up too fast, and it's not fun! You should stay a kid as long as possible!

A fairly bright boy is far more intelligent and far better company than the average adult.

My kids idea of a hard life is to live in a house with only one phone.

All teenagers have this desire to somehow run away.

Adolescence is just one big walking pimple.

Trouble is, kids feel they have to shock their elders and each generation grows up into something harder to shock.

Growing up, I wanted desperately to please, to be a good girl.

Friendships in childhood are usually a matter of chance, whereas in adolescence they are most often a matter of choice.

Everybody is a teenage idol.

I was a quiet teenager, introverted, full of angst.

Well, I could do it for a day, but I wouldn't want to be a teenager again. I really wouldn't.

You've got to grow up sometime.

When I was a teenager, I read a lot of Poe.

Maturity is only a short break in adolescence.

I mean, I'm pretty good in real life, but sometimes people seem surprised that I'm like a normal teenager and wear black nail polish and I'm just a little bit more edgy than the person I play on television.

This generation has given up on growth. They're just hoping for survival.

If you just watch a teenager, you see a lot of uncertainty.

I spent the first fourteen years of my life convinced that my looks were hideous. Adolescence is painful for everyone, I know, but mine was plain weird.

Adolescence isn't just about prom or wearing sparkly dresses.

The most important role models should and could be parents and teachers. But that said, once you're a teenager you've probably gotten as much of an example from your parents as you're going to.

Time scoots along pretty fast when you grow up.

Can you imagine young people nowadays making a study of trigonometry for the fun of it? Well I did.

I have this sense that I didn't really start growing up until my twenties.

I grew up in a house where nobody had to tell me to go to school every day and do my homework.

I think growing up is difficult and it's a process that I'm always interested in, with kids and adults, they are often on two different universes.

I liked being a teenager, but I would not go back for all the tea in China.

At the age of 16 I was already dreaming of having a baby because I felt myself to be an adult, but my mum forbid it. Right now, I feel like a teenager and I want to have fun for one or two more years before starting a family.

I think there's a time in your life where you don't feel like you fit in. I think everyone has that when you're a teenager, especially, and especially in the society we live in.

But when I was a teenager, the idea of spending the rest of my life in a factory was real depressing. So the idea that I could become a musician opened up some possibilities I didn't see otherwise.

Adolescence is a new birth, for the higher and more completely human traits are now born.

Teenagers today are more free to be themselves and to accept themselves.

The toddler must say no in order to find out who she is. The adolescent says no to assert who she is not.

Adolescence is the conjugator of childhood and adulthood.

As a teen, I was both anorexic and bulimic.

Every Teen Challenge ministry is responsible for raising its own finances, but we assist these works with finances, prayer and counseling, especially overseas in areas such as Siberia, Africa, South America.

If we as a nation are to break the cycle of poverty, crime and the growing underclass of young people ill equipped to be productive citizens, we need to not only implement effective programs to prevent teen pregnancy, but we must also help those who have already given birth so that they become effective, nurturing, bonding parents.

If a movie isn't a hit right out of the gate, they drop it. Which means that the whole mainstream Hollywood product has been skewed toward violence and vulgar teen comedy.

We won a contest at the teen fair in Vancouver and the first prize was a recording contract and we recorded at a radio station on the stairway, and we did a record and it got put out.

I instinctively dress a bit tougher because I've spent a lot of time in the U.S. and I realised there was a certain image projected of me here. I've always been an absolute rebel. When I was in my teen years I had piercings and wore all black.

I was a happy kid up until I hit the teen years.

Teen pop will never die as long as there are teens and popular music. It just takes a different head.

I found my niche as a character actor, and I've never felt like a movie star or teen idol and never wanted to.

I definitely think there could be stricter teen driving laws.

The Teen Challenge ministry was born out of those humble early days of ministry. It now includes over 500 drug and alcohol rehab centers around the world, even in Muslim countries. These include homes for girls and women addicts and alcoholics, all which are reaching many.

Doesn't matter whether it's a teen girl who's pregnant, hasn't told her parents, or an elderly couple dealing with one of them being diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Those are real people to me. Those are the people I dealt with every single day.

When I was a teenager I would lock myself in the bathroom for hours, bouffanting my hair like Patty Duke and trying to recreate Barbra Streisand's flawless eyeliner, only to comb it all out and wash it all off before stepping out into the world a butchish bisexual teen.

Before my teen years, I was losing my hearing pretty quickly, and I was getting very, very angry. I was beginning to become an angry person because of that.

The Teen Challenge Training Center on Pennsylvania farmland houses over 200 men in rehab. Other farms and centers have been birthed out of this ministry all over the world.

I am not officially involved now in the direction of the Teen Challenge ministry, but I rejoice that God permits me to be the father of these ministries.

When I found out I had to take off my shirt in 'Teen' movie, I panicked and hit the gym. I was like, 'It's going to be on film, documented, for my children to see. I can't be 140 pounds. I need to put on a little bit of muscle.'

When I started out as a music journalist, at the end of the 1980s, it was generally assumed that we were living through the lamest music era the world would ever see. But those were also the years when hip-hop exploded, beatbox disco soared, indie rock took off, and new wave invented a language of teen angst.

I didn't want to be the typical teen idol. I didn't want to be Leif Garrett. I didn't want to be Shaun Cassidy, David Cassidy or Parker Stevenson. I wanted to do my own thing.

Being a teen can be tough. Just try to surround yourself with really good friends that really have your back, and also be a really good friend to those who really care about you. If you're not sure about certain things, talk to your friends that you trust and your family.

I played teen roles until high definition came out, and I could never understand it. I would go in for adult roles and be older than many of the people auditioning, but they'd cast the girl without a line on her face.

I remember the first time I saw the 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' video. I will never forget that day. I just wanted to see Kurt Cobain's face. I had a feeling he was very cute. But, I couldn't see his face. When I finally did see him, he was even cuter than I imagined!

I don't want to be a 'teen star' because so many people don't ever grow out of that.

The distinction has blurred between young adult and adult books. Some of the teen books have become more sophisticated.

I remember as a teen being able to eat more than my father. I was growing so fast and my body couldn't keep up.

'Teen Moms!' I started watching them like the first two seasons, and I stopped. I stopped because they are too young. I feel sorry for them. And I didn't watch that show 'Hoarders.' That thing would made my skin crawl.

I was never interested in 'Teen Beat' like roles. I just wanted to work.

I think anybody who's doing work in their teen years on TV or in the movies, you're a teen idol by default.

I don't know if this is too weird to say, but this is completely surreal for me. Bizarre. The cover of 'Teen Vogue' has been on my bucket list forever.

Since my teen years I was interested in martial arts.

In the Top 40, half the songs are secret messages to the teen world to drop out, turn on, and groove with the chemicals and light shows at discotheques.

I saw myself as an outsider as a teen. I was home-schooled and got my G.E.D. when I was 16 I wasn't interested in high school at all and figured that college might be more entertaining.

When I was a teen, I thought I would have to choose between my writing or my music or my art, but it turns out it's a difficult juggling game but I can do all of them.

I don't like being compared to anyone or being in a class with someone. I'm a teen actress and therefore I'm competing against Hilary Duff. We're different people like everyone else.

I really liked 'Starter For Ten' because I grew up watching 1980s teen films like 'St. Elmo's Fire' and 'The Breakfast Club' and I've always wanted to play the underdog lead hero in a 1980s-inspired film.

Most of the offers I get from Hollywood are for teen comedies. My manager thinks I'm crazy for turning down all that money, but I'm very picky.

Teen drug use went up dramatically in the 1990s.

Research shows that parents are the single biggest influence on children - if you are worried about your teen and drugs, talk to them.

I think I'm also more open to other writers being present and listening to other opinions, whereas before I was going through my angsty teen years while making records.

Teen movies often have an unspoken underlying premise in which high school is seen as less serious than the adult world. But when your head is encased in that microcosm it's the most serious time of your life.

Well, I actually first got into music as a small child, and as I became a teen, I sought out making money from music, weather that was singing lounge gigs, backup in studios, or weddings.

Final Destination was the closest thing I've done to a teen movie but it certainly had an edge to it.

Frank Sinatra is the only one that went from teen idol to superstar.

I'd like a pop-up magazine with 45 articles on Russell Crowe. I'm like a teenager. I'd have 'Teen Beat' if I could, for grown-ups.

Yeah, I spent my teen years in West Virginia, and when I was a kid, in Louisiana. I definitely have that exposure to two different sorts of rural: the South and Appalachia.

I decided that, if I were to write a teen series, I'd want to set it in a place that was familiar to me - Manhattan, where I'd grown up - and I'd model the characters on myself and my friends.

To be honest, I haven't seen a lot of the current crop of teen movies because there's only so much time and there's nothing that really drives me to do it.

I think I am too old to be doing teen movies. I am just kind of annoyed, because you have all these teen movies coming out with usually either Lindsay Lohan or Hilary Duff doing four of the exact teen movies over and over again.

I see it as more of a teenage activity than, you know, she's only 11, but you know, I think it's great that she knows so many girls who want to play music. And I see it more as a teen activity than I do as going into music.

I'm so fascinated by the concept of teen pregnancy for some reason. Not that I condone it or promote it, but it's just a very real thing in our country and culture.

I've never done a teen movie before, but I certainly could tell you some of the ones I came very close on. I was very close on Clueless and She's All That.

I take mentoring very seriously and I am on the board of an organization called Girls Write Now, where we match teen girls and writing mentors because it changes their lives.

When I was growing up, particularly during puberty in my teen years, I was so miserable because I elicited so much teasing and meanness from my teenage cohorts.

I did work at a mall in college - I think retail/customer service is just one of the most hideous jobs in the world. So I always try to be extra nice when I go into a store. But malls are part of our culture, if you watched any teen comedy in the '80s. it's clear that malls are where we live!

Honestly, I never thought I'd actually be playing a teen lesbian. I didn't think it was going to go this far. But I'm glad that it did, because there have been a lot of fans who have expressed that they've been going through similar situations in their lives.

I'm pretty sure this is it for the teen movie thing. It's so frustrating to read when you get to page 20 and you're like, Oy! It's the same thing again!

You need to know what makes artists tick. Having been through the process myself as a musician, since I was an early teen, gave me an advantage - understanding them from their point of view, because it's about them, it's not about you - it's their vision and what they're capable of achieving, and you're the conduit.

I progressed through so many different styles of music through my teen years, both as a player and a vocalist, particularly the jazz and pop of the early 20th Century.

To all those mothers and fathers who are struggling with teen-agers, I say, just be patient: even though it looks like you can't do anything right for a number of years, parents become popular again when kids reach 20.

When I was growing up, my parents told me, 'Finish your dinner. People in China and India are starving.' I tell my daughters, 'Finish your homework. People in India and China are starving for your job.'

Youth is not a time of life; it is a state of mind; it is not a matter of rosy cheeks, red lips and supple knees; it is a matter of the will, quality of the imagination, a vigor of the emotions; it is the freshness of the deep springs of life.

There is a point in every young person's life when you realize that the youth that you've progressed through and graduate to some sort of adulthood is equally as messed up as where you're going.

The area of teenage life is not necessarily rarefied; we've all gone through that period. It's not as rarefied as a western or a space adventure or a gangster film, but it has its own dynamic.

I don't believe in 'thinking' old. Although I've transitioned through many bodies - a baby, toddler, child, teen, young adult, mid-life and older adult - my spirit is unchanged. I support my body with exercise, my mind with reading and writing, and my spirit with the knowing that I am part of the Divine source of all life.

As a teen, I heard the second Velvet Underground album, 'White Light/White Heat,' and it was too much for my limited scope of appreciation. It was intense, but I didn't get it.

I've been giving back since I was a teen, handing out turkeys at Thanksgiving and handing out toys at toys drives for Christmas. It's very important to give back as a youth. It's as simple as helping an old lady across the street or giving up your seat on the bus for someone who is pregnant.

When my dad left public life, I was 13 years old. I went through my teen years and into adulthood in relative anonymity. After my dad's funeral, I was suddenly recognizable to people I passed on the street.

I would not recommend a teen getting into modeling if they're not solid when it comes to their grades and school. That comes first. My mother always told me that came first.

Even though I was super personal with 'American Teen,' I want to tap in and not just tell my own stories but tell the stories of other people - so that I can help as many people as possible.

The evolution at 'Teen Vogue' is not a result of dinosaurs in a board room coming up with a strategy to reach the kids.

I kept getting offered all this young adult stuff. I don't want to keep telling teen coming-of-age stories!

I built my entire career off of teen comedies. I was in 'Bring It On'.

I love my mom so much, and I always have, but I was definitely a monster to her a lot during my teen years.

I think I'm trouble-adjacent. I remember hearing once that good girls don't get caught. I think that's sort of a lot of what my teen years were like. I skirted the stuff that other kids were doing because the idea of actually getting in trouble was not appealing to me, but I still wanted to have adventures.

In my teen years, I was hanging out with adults - Steven Meisel, Francois Nars, Oribe, Paul Cavaco. We had so much fun! We'd go out in New York.

In our country, being from immigrant parents, growing up black in the South, coming out at 16 years old, being a teen parent... you would assume that my life would amount to nothing. And here I stand today. So, if I can do it... you can, too!

As a teenager you are at the last stage in your life when you will be happy to hear that the phone is for you.

As I've said many times, the single most oppressed class in America right now is the teenager.

I was a teen star. That's disgusting enough.

To even be called the 'teen queen' is crazy.

I don't think there's a problem with being a teen idol, if that happens to me, I'll be happy to deal with it.

Just because you have teenagers in a movie doesn't make it a teen movie.